Power Surge 5.2

Power Surge 5.2

Volume 5, Issue 2
February 18, 2017 – February 24, 2017
Anushka Dasgupta '19 | Amy Amatya '21 | Neha Chauhan '21


'Extraordinary' growth in US shale oil could soon force OPEC to take action, IEA says February 13, 2018 | CNBC | Sam Meredith Last year, OPEC and other oil producers agreed to extend cuts on oil production to address oversupply and bring up prices. But OPEC’s influence on the market is waning with the rise of U.S. shale oil. U.S. producers have taken advantage of recovering oil prices and could surpass Saudi Arabia and Russia in energy production by 2019. OPEC may soon change its policy to in an attempt to prevent the U.S. from taking over the market. -AD

'Extraordinary' growth in US shale oil could soon force OPEC to take action, IEA says
February 13, 2018 | CNBC | Sam Meredith
Last year, OPEC and other oil producers agreed to extend cuts on oil production to address oversupply and bring up prices. But OPEC’s influence on the market is waning with the rise of U.S. shale oil. U.S. producers have taken advantage of recovering oil prices and could surpass Saudi Arabia and Russia in energy production by 2019. OPEC may soon change its policy to in an attempt to prevent the U.S. from taking over the market. -AD

Cryptocurrency mining in Iceland is using so much energy, electricity may run out February 13, 2018 | Washington Post | Rick Noack Iceland’s energy and economy are in conflict, as a country that both satisfies 81% of its electricity needs with renewable energies, and has become a recent hotspot for Bitcoin miners. Over the last three months, they have seen an inundation of requests to set up cryptocurrency mining projects in Iceland, where the large presence of hydropower makes electricity cheap and cold climate protects mining devices from overheating. While some sense a new source of revenue for the small island country, others fear incoming financial instability to a country that is already in no shortage of tourists. -AA

Cryptocurrency mining in Iceland is using so much energy, electricity may run out
February 13, 2018 | Washington Post | Rick Noack
Iceland’s energy and economy are in conflict, as a country that both satisfies 81% of its electricity needs with renewable energies, and has become a recent hotspot for Bitcoin miners. Over the last three months, they have seen an inundation of requests to set up cryptocurrency mining projects in Iceland, where the large presence of hydropower makes electricity cheap and cold climate protects mining devices from overheating. While some sense a new source of revenue for the small island country, others fear incoming financial instability to a country that is already in no shortage of tourists. -AA

Avoiding blackouts with 100% renewable energy February 8, 2018 | Science Daily | Taylor Kubota A paper by Stanford University professor Mark Z. Jacobson and his colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley, and Aalborg University in Denmark, published in Renewable Energy, outlines a plan to keep a 100 percent renewable power grid stable. These researchers wrote an earlier article outlining plans for transitioning 139 countries to entirely renewable energy by 2050. Their new article builds upon this previous work and outlines how to minimize the possibility of blackouts -- which the researchers say is the greatest fear people have preventing implementation of large-scale renewable energy systems. The study accounts for geographic proximity of various countries, some geopolitical concerns, and supply and demand variability for 30-second increments over 5 years. Its success depends on collaboration across political boundaries. -NC

Avoiding blackouts with 100% renewable energy
February 8, 2018 | Science Daily | Taylor Kubota
A paper by Stanford University professor Mark Z. Jacobson and his colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley, and Aalborg University in Denmark, published in Renewable Energy, outlines a plan to keep a 100 percent renewable power grid stable. These researchers wrote an earlier article outlining plans for transitioning 139 countries to entirely renewable energy by 2050. Their new article builds upon this previous work and outlines how to minimize the possibility of blackouts -- which the researchers say is the greatest fear people have preventing implementation of large-scale renewable energy systems. The study accounts for geographic proximity of various countries, some geopolitical concerns, and supply and demand variability for 30-second increments over 5 years. Its success depends on collaboration across political boundaries. -NC

Former Utility CEO Brings Solar Power to Africa February 12, 2018 | Scientific American/ClimateWire | Jean Chemnick Jim Rogers has long advocated for “green” initiatives - an unconventional stance for a utility executive. He began pushing for cap-and-trade legislation and the deployment of smart meters in customers’ homes to increase energy efficiency in the early 2000s. His brand of environmentalism is strategic, intended to profit utilities in the long-term while reducing carbon emissions. In 2010, he became interested in the electrification of rural areas, founding a nonprofit which deploys distributed solar systems in Africa and Latin America. That said, he believes some coal plant construction will be necessary to Africa’s growth. -AD

Former Utility CEO Brings Solar Power to Africa
February 12, 2018 | Scientific American/ClimateWire | Jean Chemnick
Jim Rogers has long advocated for “green” initiatives - an unconventional stance for a utility executive. He began pushing for cap-and-trade legislation and the deployment of smart meters in customers’ homes to increase energy efficiency in the early 2000s. His brand of environmentalism is strategic, intended to profit utilities in the long-term while reducing carbon emissions. In 2010, he became interested in the electrification of rural areas, founding a nonprofit which deploys distributed solar systems in Africa and Latin America. That said, he believes some coal plant construction will be necessary to Africa’s growth. -AD

World Class Performance by World’s First Floating Wind Farm February 15, 2018 | Oil Gas Daily An update on an October issue of Power Surge: the world’s first floating wind farm has been performing better than expected in its first 3 months of operation, already powering 20,000 UK homes. It has surpassed the capacity of comparable fixed wind farms, encouraging developers who are looking to launch floating wind farms in deep waters, where 80% of offshore wind is.  -AA

World Class Performance by World’s First Floating Wind Farm
February 15, 2018 | Oil Gas Daily
An update on an October issue of Power Surge: the world’s first floating wind farm has been performing better than expected in its first 3 months of operation, already powering 20,000 UK homes. It has surpassed the capacity of comparable fixed wind farms, encouraging developers who are looking to launch floating wind farms in deep waters, where 80% of offshore wind is.  -AA

Trump suggests 25 cent increase in gas tax, senator says February 15, 2018 | CNN | Ashley Killough This week, the Trump administration released a $1.5 trillion plan to repair and upgrade infrastructure in the U.S. The amount of federal funding which will be provided is limited to $200 billion, with the rest coming from state governments. At a bipartisan meeting on Wednesday, the President suggested a higher gas tax as an option for states to consider. California is already trying out a gas tax increase, but in an age of high fuel efficiency and electric vehicles, many find the idea outdated. -AD

Trump suggests 25 cent increase in gas tax, senator says
February 15, 2018 | CNN | Ashley Killough
This week, the Trump administration released a $1.5 trillion plan to repair and upgrade infrastructure in the U.S. The amount of federal funding which will be provided is limited to $200 billion, with the rest coming from state governments. At a bipartisan meeting on Wednesday, the President suggested a higher gas tax as an option for states to consider. California is already trying out a gas tax increase, but in an age of high fuel efficiency and electric vehicles, many find the idea outdated. -AD

Power Surge 5.1

Power Surge 5.1

Volume 5, Issue 1
February 11, 2017 – February 16, 2017
Jason Mulderrig '18 | Will Atkinson '18 | Anushka Dasgupta '19 | Joe Abbate '18 | Amy Amatya '21


Fission has been commercially viable and actually powering the grid since the mid-1950s, and currently produces a fifth of the power in the US and 72% in France. The basic process is the following: a neutron is shot into a fissile isotope (like Uranium-235, Uranium-233, or Plutonium-239). The neutron combines with the nucleus and is excited to such a high level that the newly formed (and highly unstable) atom promptly splits into fission fragments (e.g. Krypton or Barium). A relatively large amount of energy is released (100,000 as much as coal per unit mass), along with 2 to 3 further neutrons that each have a probability of impacting another fissile atom to initiate the process for new atoms. The energy released throughout the resulting chain of reactions is absorbed by a flowing fluid (like water) surrounding the reactor, which heats up to form gas, which in turn generates electricity via a turbine. TL;DR: fission is an extremely complicated physical process (the decay of atoms to form fast neutrons) which simply provides heat for an extremely low tech process (heating water to power a steam generator). The downsides to fission are high start-up costs for reactors and the problem of what to do with waste. On the other hand, fission represents a reliable (unlike solar/wind) and emission-free energy source to help balance the grid. -JAA

Fission has been commercially viable and actually powering the grid since the mid-1950s, and currently produces a fifth of the power in the US and 72% in France. The basic process is the following: a neutron is shot into a fissile isotope (like Uranium-235, Uranium-233, or Plutonium-239). The neutron combines with the nucleus and is excited to such a high level that the newly formed (and highly unstable) atom promptly splits into fission fragments (e.g. Krypton or Barium). A relatively large amount of energy is released (100,000 as much as coal per unit mass), along with 2 to 3 further neutrons that each have a probability of impacting another fissile atom to initiate the process for new atoms. The energy released throughout the resulting chain of reactions is absorbed by a flowing fluid (like water) surrounding the reactor, which heats up to form gas, which in turn generates electricity via a turbine. TL;DR: fission is an extremely complicated physical process (the decay of atoms to form fast neutrons) which simply provides heat for an extremely low tech process (heating water to power a steam generator). The downsides to fission are high start-up costs for reactors and the problem of what to do with waste. On the other hand, fission represents a reliable (unlike solar/wind) and emission-free energy source to help balance the grid. -JAA

  New Jersey Embraces an Idea It Once Rejected: Make Utilities Pay to Emit Carbon January 29, 2018 | New York Times | Brad Plumer Led by new governor Phil Murphy, New Jersey is rejoining the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), a cap-and-trade program that includes nine other northeastern states. In these states, power plants must buy permits for the carbon dioxide they emit, with the revenue often going to energy efficiency programs. RGGI states have reduced electricity emissions by 40% since 2009, without increasing electricity prices. New Jersey had left RGGI in 2012, but it now joins the states that aim to price carbon in the absence of federal climate policies. -WA Note: In addition to RGGI’s cap-and-trade program, Princeton Student Climate Initiative is exploring a carbon fee and dividend policy for New Jersey. Read the group’s draft white paper here, and email Jonathan Lu (jhlu@princeton.edu) if you’re interested in working with them! Germany Is Abandoning Its Climate Goals for 2020. What Happens Next? January 10, 2018 | QZ | Akshat Rathi Germany recently decided to give up its plans made to reduce “emissions” by 40% of 1990 levels by the year 2020. Optimists say Energiewende, or energy transition, would have been possible if not for the closing of nuclear plants and use of fossil fuels to account for the intermittency of renewables. However, most point out that Germany’s failure to reach its climate goals makes prospects bleak for other countries, given Germany’s historic push for renewable energy and their purchase of half of the world’s solar cells at one point. This outcome has us questioning the likelihood of claims that renewables can power 50% of Europe’s power by 2030. -AA

 

New Jersey Embraces an Idea It Once Rejected: Make Utilities Pay to Emit Carbon
January 29, 2018 | New York Times | Brad Plumer
Led by new governor Phil Murphy, New Jersey is rejoining the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), a cap-and-trade program that includes nine other northeastern states. In these states, power plants must buy permits for the carbon dioxide they emit, with the revenue often going to energy efficiency programs. RGGI states have reduced electricity emissions by 40% since 2009, without increasing electricity prices. New Jersey had left RGGI in 2012, but it now joins the states that aim to price carbon in the absence of federal climate policies. -WA

Note: In addition to RGGI’s cap-and-trade program, Princeton Student Climate Initiative is exploring a carbon fee and dividend policy for New Jersey. Read the group’s draft white paper here, and email Jonathan Lu (jhlu@princeton.edu) if you’re interested in working with them!

Germany Is Abandoning Its Climate Goals for 2020. What Happens Next?
January 10, 2018 | QZ | Akshat Rathi
Germany recently decided to give up its plans made to reduce “emissions” by 40% of 1990 levels by the year 2020. Optimists say Energiewende, or energy transition, would have been possible if not for the closing of nuclear plants and use of fossil fuels to account for the intermittency of renewables. However, most point out that Germany’s failure to reach its climate goals makes prospects bleak for other countries, given Germany’s historic push for renewable energy and their purchase of half of the world’s solar cells at one point. This outcome has us questioning the likelihood of claims that renewables can power 50% of Europe’s power by 2030. -AA

In Trump's First Year, the U.S. Lost Almost 10,000 Solar Jobs February 7, 2018 | The Atlantic | Robinson Meyer The U.S. solar industry has experienced nonstop growth since 2010; during that time, it has also enjoyed widespread public support - 90% in a 2016 poll. Last year, however, solar jobs took a hit. While it’s tempting to ascribe this to the new administration’s stance on solar, experts note that the anticipated expiration of a solar tax credit was more likely to blame. Many companies rushed to install more solar before the looming 2016 deadline. The same effect has been observed with wind energy tax credits in the past. However, some of the new administration’s policies, including a tax on imported solar panels and the revocation of the Clean Power plan, will soon impact the industry further. -AD

In Trump's First Year, the U.S. Lost Almost 10,000 Solar Jobs
February 7, 2018 | The Atlantic | Robinson Meyer
The U.S. solar industry has experienced nonstop growth since 2010; during that time, it has also enjoyed widespread public support - 90% in a 2016 poll. Last year, however, solar jobs took a hit. While it’s tempting to ascribe this to the new administration’s stance on solar, experts note that the anticipated expiration of a solar tax credit was more likely to blame. Many companies rushed to install more solar before the looming 2016 deadline. The same effect has been observed with wind energy tax credits in the past. However, some of the new administration’s policies, including a tax on imported solar panels and the revocation of the Clean Power plan, will soon impact the industry further. -AD

  Thermoelectric Properties and Performance of Flexible Reduced Graphene Oxide Films up to 3,000 K February 5, 2018 | Nature Energy | Tian Li et. al. A thermoelectric material is one in which a temperature change induces a current, and vice versa. While thermoelectric materials currently appear only in niche applications, they could one day generate power from combustion waste heat and replace the complex mechanical engines used in concentrated solar plants. One way to increase the efficiency of thermoelectric generators is to raise their operating temperature. This paper describes a printable graphene oxide film which  is stable up to temperatures of 3000K, compared to the best materials currently used, which are only stable up to 1500K. The development of this material is promising for the future of lightweight, scalable thermoelectric generators. -AD

 

Thermoelectric Properties and Performance of Flexible Reduced Graphene Oxide Films up to 3,000 K
February 5, 2018 | Nature Energy | Tian Li et. al.
A thermoelectric material is one in which a temperature change induces a current, and vice versa. While thermoelectric materials currently appear only in niche applications, they could one day generate power from combustion waste heat and replace the complex mechanical engines used in concentrated solar plants. One way to increase the efficiency of thermoelectric generators is to raise their operating temperature. This paper describes a printable graphene oxide film which  is stable up to temperatures of 3000K, compared to the best materials currently used, which are only stable up to 1500K. The development of this material is promising for the future of lightweight, scalable thermoelectric generators. -AD